ABA Forum on Franchising’s “Wizard” proposals do not address arbitration issue

December 30th, 2013

At the October 2013 American Bar Association Forum on Franchising Convention, the keynote program was entitled “If I had a Wizards’s Wand” and concerned what each of the four presenters would change about franchising and the law, if they could. Rochelle “Shelley” Spandorf’s proposals as part of that program are summarized by reporter Janet Sparks in this BlueMauMau.com article . While Ms. Spandorf’s proposed changes are wonderful as far as they go (if not magical), unfortunately she did not clearly address one of the most important dispute resolution issues in the U.S. legal system, including franchising; the use of mandatory pre-dispute arbitration clauses to blunt weaker parties’ access to civil justice.

Aspects of Shelley’s proposals that seem particularly commendable are requiring all new franchisors to have some base of experience, creating a uniform national regisry of franchise sales registration, mandating the provision of a financial performance representation, and freeing states’ attorney generals to puruse enforcement rather than adminiistering a registration system. Moreover, while such legislation might appear to be substantially more burdensome to franchisors than the current legal regime of franchise sales regulation, the reality is that, even in the so-called “non-registration states” most franchisees do have the ability to pursue private civil actions for material violations of the FTC Franchise Rule; for example, see Final Cut, LLC v. Sharkey, 2012 Conn Super. LEXIS 98, 2012 WL 310752 (Conn. Superior Ct., Jan. 3, 2012) (franchisee prevails under Connecticut Unfair Trade Practices Act in claims that franchise sales were made in material violation of the FTC Franchise Rule).

However, on the issue of dispute resolution, it is unclear whether the proposal that U.S. federal courts have “exclusive jurisdiction” over U.S. franchise law claims would mean that franchisors could not require arbitration instead of court proceedings. This is particularly important with regard to the ability of franchisees to pursue group or class actions. Through many Supreme Court decisions authored by conservative justices, as well as legislation passed by Republican Congressional majorities, plaintiffs seeking class certification face a rigorous burden in U.S. courts. As many an attorney can attest, there are myriad difficulties (both ethical and practical) in representing substantial groups of franchisees pursuing common claims. However, in appropriate circumstances where common questions of fact predominate, particularly on liability, use of a group or class action is the most efficient (and sometimes the ony practical) way for parties who have suffered grievous financial losses to seek a remedy. Supreme Court decisions have made it extremely easy for parties to bar class or group actions by inserting an arbitration clause in their form contracts and refusing to remove them.

While reforms freeing state attorneys’ general to focus on claims enforcement might help improve failed franchisees’ access to justice, experience shows that attorney generals tend to focus on relief for large number of consumers rather than smaller numbers of small business owners. Unless a federal franchise law contains an express exemption from the Federal Arbitration Act for disputes between franchisors and franchisees, its benefits for franchisees may prove to be illusory.

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